Henry Art Gallery

University of Washington

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Exhibitions:

2011 Exhibitions:

The Digital Eye: Photographic Art in the Electronic Age

North Galleries

July 9, 2011September 25, 2011


Image 1 / 16: Julie Blackmon. Powerade (from the series Domestic Vacations).

Image 2 / 16: Sean Dack. Untitled #9.

Image 3 / 16: Nancy Burson with Richard Carling and David Kramlich. Three Major Races.

Image 4 / 16: Chris Jordan. Plastic Bottles.

Image 5 / 16: Simen Johan. Untitled #83 (from the And Nothing was to be Trusted series).

Image 6 / 16: Paul Berger. Seattle Subtext: Front and Back Cover.

Image 7 / 16: Wendy McMurdo. Helen, Backstage, Merlin Theatre (The Glance).

Image 8 / 16: Roy McMakin. Eight Photographs of an Angel Wing Begonia.

Image 9 / 16: Joan Fontcuberta. Googlegram: Abu Ghraib.

Image 10 / 16: Takeshi Murata. 001.

Image 11 / 16: Todd Simeone. Gameboard.

Image 12 / 16: Jason Salavon. Every Playboy Centerfold, The 1970s.

Image 13 / 16: Stephanie Syjuco. Scenics (Streaming).

Image 14 / 16: The Digital Eye: Photographic Art in the Electronic Age (installation view).

Image 15 / 16: The Digital Eye: Photographic Art in the Electronic Age (installation view).

Image 16 / 16: The Digital Eye: Photographic Art in the Electronic Age (installation view).

Technology has driven the art and science of photography since the invention of the medium in the early 19th century. Digital photography is the most recent development, and in many ways the most perplexing and provocative. New cameras, printing techniques, and software allow artists greater freedom than ever before to take photographs of the real world and to generate images from the imagination. At the same time, the capacity to seamlessly merge and morph pictorial elements has social, political, and legal implications. As a challenge to photography’s documentary nature and as a catalyst for creativity, digital photography has a profound impact on visual culture.

Artists have long promoted innovation, as visionaries and beta-testers of new technologies. Never has that been more true than now. Among the artists working with digital photography, some employ it as an aesthetic tool, others as a platform for investigating new areas of photographic practice. Some treat it as a vehicle for waging social or political critique; others look to it as a subject in and of itself.

The Digital Eye, drawn from public and private collections, presents the work of some of today’s most inventive artists who use digital photographic means. This exhibition is accompanied by Henry Director Sylvia Wolf’s recent book The Digital Eye: Photographic Art in the Electronic Age (Prestel Verlag, 2010).

Curated by Henry Director Sylvia Wolf with generous support from the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation.
Featured artists: Paul Berger, Julie Blackmon, Nancy Burson, Sean Dack, Andreas Gursky, Jon Haddock, Isaac Layman, Loretta Lux, Scott McFarland, Roy McMakin, Jason Salavon, Jeff Wall, Amir Zaki
Image 1: Julie Blackmon. Powerade (from the series Domestic Vacations). 2005. Pigmented inkjet print. Courtesy of the artist and G. Gibson Gallery, Seattle.
Image 2: Sean Dack. Untitled #9. 2005. Chromogenic color print. Henry Art Gallery, gift of David and Tia Hoberman, 2008.220.
Image 3: Nancy Burson with Richard Carling and David Kramlich. Three Major Races. 1982. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Joseph and Elaine Monsen Photography Collection, gift of Joseph and Elaine Monsen and The Boeing Company, 97.32.
Image 4: Chris Jordan. Plastic Bottles. 2007. Printed inkjet print. Courtesy of the artist.
Image 5: Simen Johan. Untitled #83 (from the And Nothing was to be Trusted series). 1999. Toned gelatin silver print. Collection of Marita Holdaway. © Simen Johan. Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York.
Image 6: Paul Berger. Seattle Subtext: Front and Back Cover. 1982. Gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the artist.
Image 7: Wendy McMurdo. Helen, Backstage, Merlin Theatre (The Glance). 1995. Pigmented inkjet print. Courtesy of the artist.
Image 8: Roy McMakin. Eight Photographs of an Angel Wing Begonia. 2007. 1 of 8 chromogenic color prints. Henry Art Gallery, gift of the artist and Ambach & Rice, 2011.17.1-8. Courtesy of the artist.
Image 9: Joan Fontcuberta. Googlegram: Abu Ghraib. 2004. Pigmented inkjet print. Courtesy of the artist.
Image 10: Takeshi Murata. 001. 2007. Pigmented inkjet print. Collection of John and Shari Behnke. Courtesy of the artist and Ratio 3, San Francisco.
Image 11: Todd Simeone. Gameboard. 2003. Pigmented inkjet print. Collection of Michael Van Horn and Patricia Wittmann. Courtesy of the artist and James Harris Gallery, Seattle.
Image 12: Jason Salavon. Every Playboy Centerfold, The 1970s. 2002. Pigmented inkjet print. Collection of Timothy and Leslie Fichtner. Courtesy of the artist and Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York.
Image 13: Stephanie Syjuco. Scenics (Streaming). 2000. Chromogenic color print. Henry Art Gallery, gift of Beverly and George Martin, 2006.30. Courtesy of the artist.
Image 14: The Digital Eye: Photographic Art in the Electronic Age (installation view). 2011. Henry Art Gallery. Photo credit: R.J. Sanchez
Image 15: The Digital Eye: Photographic Art in the Electronic Age (installation view). 2011. Henry Art Gallery. Photo credit: R.J. Sanchez
Image 16: The Digital Eye: Photographic Art in the Electronic Age (installation view). 2011. Henry Art Gallery. Photo credit: R.J. Sanchez